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Proceedings of the Japan Academy, Ser. B, Physical and Biological Sciences

Vol. 87 No. 8 (2011)

  Vol. 87 No. 8 (2011)
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Reviews
Earthquake-induced soil displacements and their impact on rehabilitations
Kazuo KONAGAI
Proc. Jpn. Acad., Ser. B, Vol. 87, 433-449 (2011) [abstract] [PDF]
Adaptive regulation of membrane lipids and fluidity during thermal acclimation in Tetrahymena
Yoshinori NOZAWA
Proc. Jpn. Acad., Ser. B, Vol. 87, 450-462 (2011) [abstract] [PDF]
Interleukin-5 and IL-5 receptor in health and diseases
Kiyoshi TAKATSU
Proc. Jpn. Acad., Ser. B, Vol. 87, 463-485 (2011) [abstract] [PDF]
Regulation of phosphorylase kinase by low concentrations of Ca ions upon muscle contraction: the connection between metabolism and muscle contraction and the connection between muscle physiology and Ca-dependent signal transduction
Eijiro OZAWA
Proc. Jpn. Acad., Ser. B, Vol. 87, 486-508 (2011) [abstract] [PDF]
Original Articles
Extraction of hadron interactions above inelastic threshold in lattice QCD
Sinya AOKI, Noriyoshi ISHII, Takumi DOI, Tetsuo HATSUDA, Yoichi IKEDA, Takashi INOUE, Keiko MURANO, Hidekatsu NEMURA and Kenji SASAKI
Proc. Jpn. Acad., Ser. B, Vol. 87, 509-517 (2011) [abstract] [PDF]
Difference in radiocarbon ages of carbonized material from the inner and outer surfaces of pottery from a wetland archaeological site
Yoshiki MIYATA, Masayo MINAMI, Shin ONBE, Minoru SAKAMOTO, Hiroyuki MATSUZAKI, Toshio NAKAMURA and Mineo IMAMURA
Proc. Jpn. Acad., Ser. B, Vol. 87, 518-528 (2011) [abstract] [PDF]
Interorganellar DNA transfer in wheat: dynamics and phylogenetic origin
Koichiro TSUNEWAKI
Proc. Jpn. Acad., Ser. B, Vol. 87, 529-549 (2011) [abstract] [PDF]
Adult onset cardiac dilatation in a transgenic mouse line with Galβ1,3GalNAc α2,3-sialyltransferase II (ST3Gal-II) transgenes: a new model for dilated cardiomyopathy
Osamu SUZUKI, Takao KANAI, Toshio NISHIKAWA, Yoshie YAMAMOTO, Akira NOGUCHI, Kazuhiro TAKIMOTO, Minako KOURA, Yoko NOGUCHI, Kozue UCHIO-YAMADA, Shuichi TSUJI and Junichiro MATSUDA
Proc. Jpn. Acad., Ser. B, Vol. 87, 550-562 (2011) [abstract] [PDF]
Possible involvement of NEDD4 in keloid formation; its critical role in fibroblast proliferation and collagen production
Suyoun CHUNG, Mitsuko NAKASHIMA, Hitoshi ZEMBUTSU and Yusuke NAKAMURA
Proc. Jpn. Acad., Ser. B, Vol. 87, 563-573 (2011) [abstract] [PDF]
Cover Illustration
Kizawa Tunnel deformed in the October 23rd 2004 Mid-Niigata Prefecture Earthquake

  Kizawa Tunnel underwent a rare pattern of deformation in the October 23rd 2004 Mid-Niigata Prefecture Earthquake in Japan. Two parallel pairs of diagonal cracks of its concrete lining appeared near the north mouth of the 300m-long road tunnel. The cover illustration of this issue shows, on its upper half, photos of the cracked west (left) and east (right) tunnel walls and the laser-scanned images of these walls below them. The upper west (W1) and lower east (E2) cracks were folded inside the tunnel, while the lower west (W2) and upper east (E1) cracks were folded backwards. These axially opposite pairs of zigzag folds allowed the tunnel crown at this location to shift about 0.5m sideways with respect to the tunnel invert, indicating the presence of a large hidden shear plane cutting the tunnel in the interior of the surrounding sedimentary rocks.
  The present paper (pp. 433 to 449) in this issue highlights the importance of keeping careful and continuous eyes on the landforms, which can change all at once in a big earthquake, and furthermore keep changing slowly even after the earthquake. A challenging attempt was made in this paper to extract Lagrangian displacements of soils and rocks from the Eulerian displacements observed through remote-sensing technologies. It is worth mentioning that the extracted information was actually reflected in the successful rehabilitation measures in areas affected by the Mid-Niigata Prefecture Earthquake.

Kiyoshi Horikawa
Member of the Japan Academy

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